beliefs: Do they help or harm?

First, let’s examine the origin of our beliefs. Our earliest beliefs probably come from our caregivers.

Then, we are bombarded by more beliefs by our schools, churches, peer groups, or social organizations. On top of this, we begin to develop our own beliefs about things. This is not a bad thing.

However, it is important to examine whether those beliefs are helping or hindering us. How do we do that?

Well, I would encourage people to use their intuition, or internal guidance systems, to do this. Let’s take the example of yesterday’s post. Prior to examining my beliefs about success, I believed that I was a failure because I didn’t have the grades or that dream job. If I had tuned into my intuition, this is what it would look like.

I would have taken a deep breath and asked myself how the belief made me feel. Perhaps I would have felt a tightness in my stomach or some anxiety around the issue. Then, I could have asked myself: What are the most likely consequences of maintaining this belief?

Then, I could have replaced it with a more positive belief about success instead of learning to do it the heard way. In the next post, I will give you some suggestions on how to transform those limiting beliefs. In the meantime, I encourage you to try the above exercise. Pick one area of your life such as finances, career, or health and list your beliefs about those things.

Then, take a deep breath, relax, and tune into the sensations in your body. Ask yourself: How does this belief make me feel? If it feels negative, ask yourself: What are the consequences of holding onto this limiting belief? If you’re ready to take this a step further, ask yourself: What is a more empowering belief?

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redefining success

How do we define this thing called success anyway? Don’t we all want to be successful? Well, that’s a great start, but first we have to define it for ourselves. I used to think that if I earned good grades in school, worked really hard, and strived for perfection, I’d eventually find that dream job and start earning some money. Maybe then, I could say that I was successful. Well, I have a confession for you. Some of my college grades weren’t really that great, I’m not perfect, and I’m definitely not rolling in dough.

So if I were to use my previous definition of success, then I’d have to say that I am a failure. However, I prefer not to think of myself that way. I believe that in order to define success, we need to take a more holistic approach. That is, we need to look at the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual aspects of our situation. Now, after taking my previous view of success and replacing it with a holistic view, let’s take another look at the subject. Within the last two years, I’ve lost fifty pounds, significantly decreasing my risk of developing certain diseases. As a result, I’m more active and have more energy. I’ve also adopted a more positive attitude, significantly reduced the effects of negative self-talk, and decreased my dosage of antidepressant medication. I’ve also graduated from college with a degree in social work, began writing a book, and will be starting an intuitive counseling business. I’d say that after redefining success, I can see that I am successful. How do you define success?

When you think of letting go, many things might come to mind. You can let go of physical things such as the pair of shoes that you just had to have, but you realize that they don’t go with anything you own anyway.

You may also have to let go of a relationship that just isn’t working anymore. Perhaps, like me, you’re getting ready to move away from your house for the first time, or perhaps you’re struggling to let go of a deceased loved one.

Maybe that job isn’t working for you anymore, and it’s time to try something new.

Whatever the case may be for you, letting go of our old “stuff” is a necessary part of allowing something new into our lives.

Let’s use career as an example. When I began studying to be a social worker, I thought that it was my purpose in life. I was so excited about getting out there in the field and helping people.

However, I kept getting this nagging feeling. I was aware of my intuitive gifts, and I was frustrated that social work didn’t fully address the spiritual aspect of people’s problems. I finally decided on intuitive counseling as a career.

In order to allow this new beginning, I have had, and still have to, let go of many things.

I’ve had to let go of the thought that social work is my only life purpose.

I’ve had to let go of the belief that I was somehow evil or wrong for doing this.

I have to let go of my deep need for my family’s approval.

So how can we practice letting go? Well, let’s start with the physical things that we no longer need. You can practice letting go by deciding what you are going to keep, what needs to be thrown away, and what can be given away. Then, welcome something new into your space by buying a plant or some new clothes to replace the old ones.